Diamond Technology

 

Diamond as an Engineering Material

Engineering Material

Diamond has been used in a variety of industries such as oil & gas, aerospace, car manufacturing, mining and many other custom engineering applications. Due to its extreme hardness, wear resistance and thermal conductivity it is an ideal choice for extreme conditions and applications.

Explore more about how diamond can be the engineering solution you are looking for.

Diamond vs. PCD

PCD vs Natural Diamond

Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) is superior to natural diamond in many ways because of its cost effectiveness, isotropic characteristics and high wear resistance.

PCD also does not suffer from many of the weaknesses that natural diamond has like high cost, uneven wear, high variability and large cleavage planes.

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What is PCD?

Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) is diamond grit that has been bonded under high-pressure, high-temperature conditions.

Typically, PCD is bonded to a tungsten carbide substrate during the same high-temperature, high-pressure (HPHT) process. This sintered diamond and tungsten carbide composite is known as a polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC).

Hardness

  • Diamond is the hardest material known to man - harder than tungsten carbide, steel, silicon nitride and silicon carbide
  • Ideal for applications that require greater toughness and durability
  • Sintered diamond-to-diamond particles in a coherent structure through a HPHT process
  • Randomly oriented diamond-to-diamond bonds to eliminate weak planes and prevent tool cracking

Harsh Environments

  • Diamond material is resistant to corrosive and erosive environments
  • Easily operates in any chemical or process fluid environment
  • Combines fracture toughness and hardness for improved durability
  • Handles extremely high load capacities
  • Offers lower coefficient of friction than tungsten carbide, steel and teflon
  • Resistant to all acids and bases

Long Life and Wear

  • Super-hard engineering material for abrasive environments
  • Ideal cutting and drilling tool material
  • Superior wear resistance to support ultra-long tool life
  • Higher fracture toughness than silicon nitride and silicon carbide

Thermal Conductivity

  • Highest thermal conductivity available in an engineering material
  • Reduces localized temperature extremes that lead to material degradation
  • Disperses heat better than tungsten carbide, steel, silicon nitride, silicon carbide, and even copper
  • Excellent for heat sinks and applications in harsh environments

Cited References

DENSITY

Glowka DA, Stone CM. Effects of thermal and mechanical loading on PDC bit life. SPE Drilling Engineering 1986;1:201-14.
3.90 g/cm3 Bertagnolli, US Synthetic
COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

Lammer A. Mechanical properties of polycrystalline diamonds. Materials Science and Technology 1988;4:949-55.
6.9-7.6 GPa Roberts, Debeers
TRANSVERSE RUPTURE STRENGTH

Wentorf RH, DeVries RC, Bundy FP. Sintered superhard materials. Science 1980;208:872-80.
1.3-1.6 GPa Cooley, US Synthetic
YOUNGS MODULUS

Wentorf RH, DeVries RC, Bundy FP. Sintered superhard materials. Science 1980;208:872-80.
890 GPa Roberts, Debeers
FRACTURE TOUGHNESS

Lin TP, Cooper GA, Hood M. Measurement of the fracture toughness of polycrystalline diamond using the double-torsion test. Journal of Materials Science 1994;29:4750-6.
13 MPa√m1/2 Jiang Qian, US Synthetic
HARDNESS (KNOOP)

Roberts DC. SYNDITE – its mechanical and physical properties. Industrial Diamond Review 1979;39:237-41.
49.8 GPa Debeers
COEFFICIENT OF
THERMAL EXPANSION


Glowka DA, Stone CM. Effects of thermal and mechanical loading on PDC bit life. SPE Drilling Engineering 1986;1:201-14.
1.3-3.9, 10-6/°C Glowka, SNL
COEFFICIENT OF FRICTION
(PCD on PCD in H2O)


Sexton TN, Cooley CH. Polycrystalline diamond thrust bearings for down-hole oil and gas drilling tools. Wear 2009;267:1041-5.
0.05-0.08 Sexton, US Synthetic
THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY

Keshavan MK, Liang B, Russell M. Tribological properties of polycrystalline diamond and its application. Finer Points 1990;2:21-7.
543 w/m-K Lin, UC Berkeley